Stop and Smell the Roses

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Post by Suzanne R Banks

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“Rose is a rose is a rose is a rose.” Gertrude Stein, 1935

Some say Gertrude Stein is referring to the rose like this to express her feeling that things are what they are. According to Wikipedia: “In Stein’s view, the sentence expresses the fact that simply using the name of a thing already invokes the imagery and emotions associated with it,..” So when you say rose do you invoke the scent, or the colour, or everything? It is the most romanticised flower in history and appears in many poems, prose and plays. It is often associated with love and intimate moments of the heart.

Stop and Smell the Roses

Do you take time to stop and smell the roses? What is life if we don’t connect to its beauty at every turn? The scent of a beautiful rose is a true gift of nature which invites us to convene with the oneness of the universe in the now!

rosa-centifloiaRosa centifolia – another rose used to make essential oil

I never buy a rose that doesn’t have a scent – to me that’s the most important part. Isn’t it a wonderful thing when you enter your house to be greeted by the natural perfume of roses? Essential oil of rose is made by either steam distillation or as an absolute (where the scent is extracted into a fat and then lifted by a solvent). I tend not to buy absolutes as there seems to be a heavy chemical intervention and I’d rather have my oils extracted in the simplest way.

Rose oil is a complex arrangement of hundreds of molecules, some of which have still not been identified. No wonder it is referred to as the “Queen of Oils”. We know Cleopatra used roses in her beauty regime, and it is claimed she used rose petals in her boudoir to seduce Marc Anthony from the Roman Empire. The Romans used roses too, and the mention of roses appear in Christian, Buddhist and Confucian literature. Roses are seen in Asian motifs dating back to 3000 BC. It seems as though commercial production of rose oils and rose by products can be traced to Persia in the 10th century. The oil was referred to as “attar of roses” or “rose otto”, which is a term still used today.

rosa_gallica_jamesmasonRosa gallica – a sub species named “James Mason”

So what can we use use rose oil for?

* use rose oil to help with any heat or infection in the body (you would put a few drops into some carrier oil and smooth it on the face and body – a great treatment for any illness)

* use this rose body oil to help take the sting out of eczema and psoriasis

* a drop on the temple to relieve stress and tension and counteract a headache

* a great oil for attending to grief (use it a single drop on the heart chakra or in a personal mist or room mist)

* a drop added to your facial oil or cream will refine your skin and give you one of the most powerful aromatherapy treatments in the world. You will feel soft, unruffled, connected to the universe and ready to be the Queen of your world

* a few drops of rose oil in an oil burner will create a scented paradise of peace and calm so it’s great for upset children, the elderly and even pets (if you are using 3% in jojoba it’s not really suitable for an oil burner – you will need to buy the pure oil)

* a drop or two in the right place, as a perfume, will do amazing things for your self esteem as rose is the oil of self-love and nurturing

rosa-damascenaRosa damascena – the most used rose for oil production

When buying rose oil you will mostly find it comes in a 3 % dilution in jojoba oil and this is simply because it is a premium oil and is very expensive. Even if you buy wholesale, pure rose oil can cost hundreds of dollars. It is precious!

Remember, treat yourself first then everyone will benefit!

Suzanne R Banks x

Ed: If you thought this was good go see the Suzanne R Banks site (LINK JUMP) or like her Facebook Page (LINK JUMP)

All Photos from Suzanne R Banks site. This post is a reprise of a piece from Suzanne R Banks blog

12 comments on “Stop and Smell the Roses

  1. brie says:

    Beautiful Suzanne! As I said before I always stop to smell the roses (literally and figuratively!).

  2. Ellen Covey says:

    One thing that I love about roses is that even though they all smell like rose, the variations in odor profile are so striking from one variety to the next. It’s amazing to be in a rose garden and compare them.

  3. solanace says:

    Loved reading this post! We should all be smelling the roses and being nice to each other…

  4. odonata9 says:

    I always stop to smell the roses (and jasmine and honeysuckle and whatever else I can find!). We recently moved into a house where the owners (we are renting) planted tons of roses, which are currently blooming like crazy. There are about 8 different ones, mostly light pink, dark pink and white and the range of scents is amazing. There is 1 that is almost scentless and my favorite has a very citrusy rose scent.

  5. poodle says:

    I love roses but they are so hard for me to grow in my yard. Just don’t have the right amout of sun I guess. So I got inspired by this post and I spritzed myself with SSS Velvet Rose.

  6. Ines says:

    At the moment I am using a rose oil for the face by the Burren perfumery and it’s wonderful for my skin. I don’t think I’ll be trying something else anytime soon. 🙂

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